10. Configuration

When the gears icon in the navigation bar is clicked, or the Settings header in the left sidebar is clicked, the Settings section of the left sidebar expands.

Left Sidebar Settings
Figure 10.1 – Settings Options

The Settings pane in the left sidebar is used to cycle through company-wide settings, including the following. Clicking on an item in this list will take you to the corresponding configuration section.

The center pane of the user interface is context sensitive, and will change based on the selection in the Settings section.

There are a two other configuration items that are available in the right sidebar, and are context sensitive. Those are Configuration and Schedule.

Clicking Configuration will display contact information for your company and if you are an administrator, and the top company level is selected in the left sidebar, an option to set the company’s timezone will be visible. This settings effects scheduling and utilization numbers and should be set appropriately.

Company settings timezone

Figure 10.2 – Company Timezone Setting

If an organizational unit is selected in the left sidebar, clicking Configuration will display controls which allow you change the name of the unit.

Configuration organizational unit name change controls

Figure 10.3 – Org Unit Name Change

If a piece of equipment is selected in the left sidebar when Configuration is clicked, settings related to equipment will be displayed. See the Managing Equipment section for details on those settings.

The other configuration option in the right sidebar is Schedule. At the company level, this allows you to view and edit the global schedule that all departments and equipment will inherit. Schedules can be edited at each level of the company hierarchy, allowing departments and equipment to have individual schedules. See the Managing Schedules section for more details.

Company settings schedule

Figure 10.4 – Company Global Schedule Setting

10.1 Building the Company Tree

In most cases, the company tree should be built so that it reflects your organization’s structure. If your organization has multiple facilities spread across the country, you might put each facility as a separate group directly under the top level company entry. After that departments, groups and workcells might be added below each facility. Units that go under a company in the tree are referred to as a “child” or “organizational unit” of the company. An organization with a single facility might start at the department level, and then add things like groups and workcells below those departments. It is completely up to you how you want to structure the company tree, and it is best to give the layout some thought before starting this process.

To begin building the company tree, click on the company name, which should be the top (and initially the only) item in the tree.

Configuration company entry only in company tree

Figure 10.1.1 – Company Entry By Itself In Company Tree

Clicking on the company should ensure that the company is selected for the rest of this process. At the bottom of the left sidebar is a “+” button that will bring up a menu. That menu has two options: Add Org Unit and Add Equipment.

Configuration company tree add button

Figure 10.1.2 – Add Child Button

Clicking the Add Org Unit button will bring up a dialog where you can enter the Child name of the group you want to add to the company. Click the Save changes button once the name has been entered.

Configuration company tree add child dialog

Figure 10.1.3 – Add Child Dialog

The child that you created should now be visible in the company tree.

Configuration company selected in company tree

Figure 10.1.4 – New child Entry in Company Tree

Additional direct children of the company entry can be added by making sure the company is selected, and then clicking the Add Org Unit  option again. To add a sub-child to the new child entry, click on that entry to select it and then use the add button (“+”) to add new entries.

Configuration company tree with new child selected

Figure 10.1.5 – New Child Entry Selected in Company Tree

You can now click the Add Org Unit button and add a sub-child. Children can be nested this way down to any level that reflects your organization’s structure. Once you are at a level where it is appropriate to start adding equipment, you can click the Add Equipment button in the left sidebar. Doing so displays the Add equipment dialog. In this dialog you can enter the Equipment name and click the Save changes button.

Company settings add equipment dialog

Figure 10.1.6 – Add new equipment Dialog

The equipment should now show up under the appropriate child in the company tree.

Configuration new equipment in company tree

Figure 10.1.7 – New Equipment Entry in Company Tree

There is another tab on the Add equipment dialog called Existing equipment, and that exists to move equipment from on part of an organization to another. If you needed to move a piece of equipment between two facilities or departments, this is what you would use. The Parent field will always be filled in with the child you have selected in the company tree when you open the Add equipment dialog. You then select the equipment that you want to move into this child using the Equipment dropdown, and click the Save changes button.

Company settings add existing equipment dialog

Figure 10.1.10 – Add Existing Equipment Dialog Tab

10.2 Managing Equipment

Settings for an individual piece of equipment can be accessed by clicking on the equipment entry in the company tree. Once the equipment has been selected, the equipment settings can be shown by clicking on Configuration in the right-hand sidebar.

Configuration equipment settings

Figure 10.2.1 – Equipment Settings

Here is a list of each setting along with a short description.

  1. Name: Enter a name for the equipment that would be recognized by employees.
  2. Category: What type of equipment this is, whether that is a CNC machine, furnace, etc. If you do not see your equipment type listed, feel free to contact support to have it added.
  3. Manufacturer: The name of the company that built the equipment. If you do not see your equipment’s manufacturer listed, feel free to contact support to have it added.
  4. Model: The model designation assigned by the manufacturer. If the model of your equipment does not appear in the list, you can type it in as you would with any other text field. Please try to match the manufacturer’s format for the model designation as closely as possible.
  5. Potential revenue / hour ($): When this is populated with the revenue a piece of equipment is expected to make per hour, a ratio of dollars made versus dollars lost (to downtime) will be displayed on the machine detail view.
  6. Maximum allowed cycle time (seconds): The length of cycle time that will never be exceeded for this equipment. Default is 300 seconds (5 minutes).
  7. Excessive downtime threshold (seconds): The length of time before an excessive downtime entry is logged in the excessive downtime report. Defaults to 2100 seconds (35 minutes).
  8. Save: Be sure to click this button after changes have been made to the equipment settings. Otherwise changes will not be permanent.
10.2.1 Assigning A New Device to Equipment

A device can be attached to a piece of equipment by selecting the equipment in the Company Tree, then expanding the Devices item in the right sidebar.

Configuration devices item right sidebar

Figure 10.2.2 – Devices in Right Sidebar

Clicking the Add device button opens the Add device dialog which allows users to attach devices to equipment. This is required to begin collecting data on a piece of equipment. Please be sure to match the device to the equipment it is actually installed on.

Add device dialog

Figure 10.2.3 – Add device Dialog

An explanation of each field in the dialog is below.

  1. Parent: This field cannot be changed because it is determined by the equipment that was selected when the Add device button was clicked.
  2. Device UUID: A device ID matching the device that was installed on the piece of equipment. The full ID can be copied from the Unassigned devices list on the Devices configuration page. See the Managing Devices section for more details.
  3. Input Config: This is the type of signal the LCM2M device is setting from the equipment. There are two main types of input signals, pulsed and sustained. A pulsed signal is on momentarily one or more times per cycle, and a sustained signal stays on throughout the entire cycle and goes off when the cycle is complete (or the equipment transitions to being idle). Editing this field is described below.
  4. Edit Input Config: Clicking this button will allow alteration of the Input Config (see below).
  5. Primary: It is not a standard configuration, but a piece of equipment can have multiple LCM2M devices on it. This check box allows you to set whether this device is the primary or secondary device. The default is Primary.
  6. Active: If a device is not currently being used, this box can be unchecked. Cycle data will not be collected for inactive devices. The default is Active.
  7. Save changes: This button must be clicked before device configuration changes are made permanent.
  8. Cancel: This button prevents the current set of changes form being made permanent, and closes the dialog.

Clicking the edit button with the pencil icon (#4 in the list above) will open the Edit Input Config dialog. This dialog allows a user to select which inputs to monitor, how those inputs are interpreted by the system, and whether or not to ignore short signal pulses (i.e. if a stack light flashes while the equipment is in change-over). The purpose of each of the items in this dialog are described below.

Edit input config dialog

Figure 10.2.4 – Edit Input Config Dialog

  1. This drop down allows for copying the input configuration from an existing piece of equipment. If there is a known piece of equipment that already has its device (the Primary, Active one) set up to work for the current equipment, the input configuration can be copied from that equipment to save time.  The Copy button (item #2) must be clicked for the operation to complete.
  2. This button must be clicked to copy the input configuration from another piece of equipment to the current device. This button will not be enabled until a piece of equipment has been selected from the Copy From Equipment drop down (item #1).
  3. Selects between Sustained and Pulsed. A pulsed signal is on momentarily one time per cycle, and a sustained signal stays on throughout the entire cycle and goes off when the cycle is complete (or the equipment transitions to being idle).
  4. Selects the first of the physical inputs on a Caddis device that will be used to define a cycle. Typically only one signal is needed to define a cycle, but there is the option to define more complex input schemes.
  5. Selects whether a high signal means that the equipment is running, or that a low signal means that the equipment is running. This implies that the opposite signal state means that the equipment is down.
  6. When checked, ignores signals that are less than a certain duration. This is useful for filtering out signals that may fluctuate while the machine is running (i.e. a flashing stack light). This is used in conjunction with the Seconds setting (item #7).
  7. Used with the checkbox (item #6), this specifies the length threshold for a signal to be on before it will be recognized by the system. The default is 5 seconds.
  8. For more complex signalling schemes, this plus button can be clicked to add another input section. It also adds a logic operator (and/or) that defines how the second input’s signal should be interpreted in relation to the first’s. For instance, it could be required that both of the 24 volt inputs on the Caddis device see high signals before the equipment can be considered running.
  9. Provides a human-readable text explanation of the resulting input configuration.
10.2.2 Assigning An Existing Device to Equipment

There is a Existing Device (second) tab on the Add device dialog for adding existing devices to a piece of equipment.

Configuration add existing device dialog

Figure 10.2.5 – Add Existing Device Tab

An explanation of each field is below:

  1. Parent: This field cannot be changed because it is determined by the equipment that was selected when the Add device button was clicked.
  2. Device: A dropdown list showing all the devices in the company that can be assigned to this equipment. If the dialog shows No existing devices to reassign, then at least once device will need to be added to the company.
  3. Make primary: This checkbox sets whether this device is the primary device if multiple devices are assigned to a single piece of equipment. Checking this box will make any existing primary devices on the equipment non-primary. The primary device is the one that determines when a cycle happens for the piece of equipment.
  4. Make active: This checkbox sets whether the device being attached to the equipment will be active or not. If the device is not active, it will not record cycle data.
  5. Save changes: This button must be clicked before device configuration changes are made permanent.
  6. Cancel: This button prevents the current set of changes form being made permanent, and closes the dialog.

10.3 Managing Devices

Devices can be viewed and configured by clicking on Settings -> Devices in the left sidebar. There are two tables in the device management view. The first is labeled Devices, and the second is below the first and is labeled Unassigned Devices.

10.3.1 Devices Table

The Devices table shows all active devices within your organization by default. There is a Show inactive devices checkbox which will also include devices that have had their Active checkboxes unchecked, meaning that that will not record cycle data.

Configuration devices show inactive devices checkbox

Figure 10.3.1.1 – Show inactive devices Checkbox

The Devices table columns and their meanings are listed below.

Configuration devices table

Figure 10.3.1.2 – Devices Table

  1. UUID: The ID of the device, which is assigned by LCM2M and is used to associate a device to a piece of equipment.
  2. Attached to: The piece of equipment that the device is assigned to. If the device is not assigned to any equipment, it will be in the Unassigned devices table.
  3. Device type: Reserved for later use. Will always display Caddis for now.
  4. Input setup: How the device is configured to respond to the electrical inputs from the machine (outputs from the machine’s perspective). There is a table in the section on adding a new device to equipment that explains what each of the input type designations mean.
  5. Latest IP: Shows the latest known IP (network) address of the device. This address can be helpful when troubleshooting network connection issues.
  6. Date added: The date the device was entered into the system. This date is never updated, and always reflects the first time the device was set up.
  7. Primary: Whether the device is the primary data collection device or not. The primary device determines when a cycle happens, and a secondary device is simply for extra data collection (temperatures, analog inputs, etc).
  8. Edit: There is an Edit button for each row in the table which opens the Edit device dialog. This dialog allows a user to change the Input type, Device type, and whether the device is Primary and Active (collecting data or not). The Edit device dialog is covered in section 10.3.3.
10.3.2 Unassigned Devices Table

The Unassigned devices table displays just the device IDs (UUID) of any devices which have been entered for your company, but have not been assigned to equipment. The UUID text can be copied directly out of this table, and used to add the device to a piece of equipment.

10.3.3 Edit device Dialog

When the Edit button is clicked in the Devices table, the Edit device dialog is displayed. The diagram below shows each setting of this dialog, followed by a description of each.

Figure 10.3.3.1 – Edit device Dialog

  1. Device UUID – The unique identifier of the device. This UUID is set by Caddis Systems and cannot be edited.
  2. Input Config – This displays the current input configuration for the device. The input config determines how the device will interpret signals coming from the equipment it is monitoring. This is best set in collaboration with Caddis Systems support.
  3. Input Config Edit Button – Clicking this button will allow an administrator to alter the input configuration. This is best set in collaboration with Caddis Systems support.
  4. Device Type – Reserved for use by Caddis Systems.
  5. Telemetry Data Rate – Telemetry data is gathered at a set rate in addition to the normal cycle data that the device collects. This can be useful for tracking and alarming on metrics such as temperature, even when the equipment is not actively cycling (i.e. a furnace). The minimum this value can be set to is 30 seconds and collecting telemetry will influence how some data charts look and operate. This control will not be visible on a device that has not been updated to support telemetry. If telemetry is needed and this control is not visible, please contact Caddis Systems support. Device data fees apply on devices even when telemetry data is used without an active cycle signal.
  6. Information Button – Hovering the mouse cursor over this icon will provide additional information about telemetry.
  7. Primary – Whether or not this is the primary data collection device on the equipment.
  8. Active – Whether or not this device is set to actively capture data. When unchecked the device will not collect data, even when its input signal(s) from the equipment change.
  9. Remove from equipment – Clicking this button will remove the device being edited from its associated equipment. Doing this will cause the device to stop collecting data, and could result in data loss. However, this button is useful when replacing a device.

10.4 Managing Tags

Tags allow you to attach extra information to cycles. That information can be things like part numbers and workorder numbers. Tracking information using tags allows you to correlate data from production items across runs. This can be helpful in discovering trends relevant to an item, even when it has been a long time since you ran it. Tags are exported with raw cycle data which can aid in data analysis with third-party tools. Instructions on how to export that data can be found in the Raw Cycle Data reports section.

To begin defining tags, first click on Settings -> Tags in the left sidebar. That will display Manage Tags table (described below) with a New tag button at the top right.

Configuration manage tags new tag button

Figure 10.4.1 – New tag Button

This will open the New tag dialog, which will allow you to set the information below.

Configuration manage tags new tag dialog

Figure 10.4.2 – New Tag Dialog

  1. Group: Tags can be grouped by subject, such as part numbers, workorder numbers, a customer name, etc. This provides a level of organization to the tag system. This control is a dropdown list, but also allows input. If there are tags available for your company, they will be displayed in the dropdown. If the tag you wish to use is not available, you can enter it directly in the text box at the top of the dropdown list, and then click the light blue Create group bar that appears. The Group field can be left blank as well if you do not want to group the new tag.
  2. Tag name: Give the tag a descriptive name that will be intuitive to other users within your company. For example, if entering a tag for a part number, try to follow the standard format for that part number as closely as possible.
Configuration manage tags new group button

Figure 10.4.3 – Create group Clickable Bar

Once groups and tags have been defined, they will be displayed in the Manage Tags table.

Configuration manage tags completed table

Figure 10.4.4 – Manage Tags Table With Newly Created Groups and Tags

The names of the groups appear in the top left of each table section, and if there are tags without a group, that table section will be tagged with the text No group. The date each tag was created is also displayed. In the Modify column, there is a red Deactivate link. When this is clicked, the text changes to a green Activate link, and the tag moves down to an Inactive Tags table section. If that tag was the last one in a group, that group’s table section will disappear, but the group information is retained in the Inactive Tags section.

Configuration manage tags inactive tags table

Figure 10.4.5 – Inactive Tags Table Section

By clicking the Activate link, the tag will be restored to its original group. If the tag is the only one in a group, the group will be restored as well. Inactive tags are not available to be attached to cycle data.

After tags have been defined, they can be attached to cycles at the equipment level in the main web interface by clicking the tags icon below the device ID.

Configuration manage tags icon

Figure 10.4.6 – Tags Icon

Clicking the tags icon opens the Edit active cycle tags dialog.

Configuration active tags dialog

Figure 10.4.7 – Edit active cycle tags Dialog

This dialog allows you to set which tag is active for the cycle data currently being collected. The selection is made through the Tags dropdown list. The # of effective cycles field allows you to set a number of cycles the tag will be active for. If you know the number of cycles for a given production run, this can be a good way to ensure that the tag does not stay active longer than it should. Make sure to click the Save changes button to save your selection.

Once an active tag has been set, it will be displayed next to the tags icon. If no tags are selected for the cycle data currently being collected, the text will read No active tags – click to set. This is what is shown in Figure 10.4.6.

10.5 Managing Alarms

Alarms can be configured to alert users when certain events happen. Examples of events are:

  • A piece of equipment has been down for too long (excessive downtime)
  • An LCM2M device has gone offline (lost network connection or power)
  • A cycle data value has gone above or below a threshold

Alarms can be configured by clicking Settings -> Alarms in the left sidebar. The Alarms view is then displayed, which holds any alarms that have already been defined, as well as a button to create new alarms.

Configuration alarms table

Figure 10.5.1 – Alarms Table

  1. New alarm: Button which launches a dialog to create a new alarm. Be sure to check existing alarms first to see if one has already been created that will fit your needs. Creating an alarm is covered in the next section.
  2. Equipment: Table column showing which piece of equipment the alarm is set for.
  3. Alarm type: What type of alarm is set. Examples include Excessive downtime, Offline detection and Temperature.
  4. Settings: Holds attributes of the alarm such as the threshold value, the units the threshold are in, and whether or not the alarm is active outside of scheduled production time.
  5. Device Outputs: If an alarm is tied to a specific physical output of the device, that output will be listed in this column.
  6. Subscribers: After an alarm is created, it can be subscribed to by other users within your company. This field shows which users are subscribed and whether they are subscribed via email, text or both.
  7. My subscriptions: Shows an envelope icon if you are subscribed to an alarm via email, and a mobile phone icon if subscribed via text. Nothing will be displayed if you are not subscribed to the alarm, and you can be subscribed via both email and text at the same time.
  8. Actions: When there are alarms in the table, this column will hold buttons to Subscribe and Unsubscribe.
  9. Edit: Allows a user to change the settings for an alarm.

When any configured alarms are triggered, they will appear in the right sidebar in the alarms section.

10.5.1 Creating an Alarm

Clicking the New alarm button opens the Add alarm dialog. A description of each of the settings is below.

Configuration add tags dialog

Figure 10.5.1.1 – Add alarm Dialog

  1. Equipment: Selects the piece of equipment that this alarm will be active for. The equipment has to already exist in the system.
  2. Alarm Type: What type of alarm is set. Examples include Excessive downtime, Offline detection and Temperature.
  3. Subscribe?: How you want to receive notifications about the alarm. The boxes can be checked for email, text or both. If there is a red information icon next to the text checkbox, it means that a textable mobile number needs to be set for your account. See the section on managing personal settings for instructions on how to do that.

When an alarm type is selected, the dialog will expand to cover other options. Examples of the additional settings used to create 3 types of alarms are outlined in the following sections.

10.5.2 Creating an Excessive Downtime Alarm

An excessive downtime alarm will warn a user if a piece of equipment has shown down for more than the specified threshold. This is not the same as the Excessive downtime threshold set in the equipment configuration. There are three settings added when you select Excessive downtime as the Alarm type.

Configuration add excessive downtime alarms dialog

Figure 10.5.2.1 – Adding an Excessive Downtime Alarm

  1. Threshold: The amount of time before a piece of equipment can show down before the alarm is triggered. What you set this value at is influenced by the Threshold unit setting just below it.
  2. Threshold unit: Whether the Threshold you set is interpreted as Seconds, Minutes or Hours.
  3. Restrict to schedule?: Determines if alarm notifications are only sent during scheduled production time. If checked, only alarms triggered during scheduled production time will be sent.
10.5.3 Creating an Offline Detection Alarm

An offline detection alarm will alert a user if the device attached to a piece of equipment has lost power or network connection. This type of alarm can be very important, especially on equipment where it is critical to ensure that data is being collected consistently. There are two settings added when you select Offline detection as the Alarm type.

Configuration add offline detection alarm dialog

Figure 10.5.3.1 – Adding an Offline Detection Alarm

  1. Threshold: The amount of time a device can be offline before the alarm is triggered. What you set this value at is influenced by the Threshold unit setting just below it.
  2. Threshold unit: Whether the Threshold you set is interpreted as Seconds, Minutes or Hours.
10.5.4 Creating a Temperature Alarm

A temperature alarm can be triggered either when a temperature goes above or below a threshold. To set a window of acceptable temperatures, two separate alarms need to be configured, one above the window and one below. There are two settings added when you select Temperature as the Alarm type.

Configuration add temperature alarm dialog

Figure 10.5.4.1 – Adding a Temperature Alarm

  1. Operator: The options are Greater than and Less than. These are the same as the common mathematical operators and correspond to when a value goes above and below the threshold.
  2. Value: The threshold value that is to be used with the operator. If the Greater than operator is set, and this field is set to 400, it establishes that the alarm will be triggered if the value goes above 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

10.6 Managing Schedules

Schedules are very important for ensuring accurate utilization calculations. Utilization is calculated based on the number of hours that a piece of equipment actually runs versus the number of hours that it was supposed to run. The schedule helps determine that second part. A schedule can be inherited at lower levels of the company tree, meaning that you can set a master schedule at the company level, and then override it as needed at the department and equipment level. The schedule is influenced by the timezone setting in the company configuration. That must be set properly before the schedule is configured.

10.6.1 Global Company Schedule

To set the global schedule for your company, first select your company in the Company Tree. When the company is properly selected, its item in the company tree will be highlighted.

Configuration company selected in company tree

Figure 10.6.1.1 – Company Tree With Company Selected

Selecting the company and clicking Schedule in the right sidebar will populate the right sidebar with a view of the schedule, including an Edit button.

Configuration manage schedule sidebar section

Figure 10.6.1.2 – Schedule Section in Sidebar

Clicking on the Edit button brings up the Edit schedule dialog.

Configuration schedule example

Figure 10.6.1.3 – Edit schedule Dialog

Notice that for each schedule entry there is a drop down that allows you to select the shift it is associated with. This is very important for shift-based metrics.

If there are days that the company never runs, such as Sunday, the schedule for that day can be removed by hovering your mouse cursor over the time range at the end of the bar and clicking the trash can icon.

Configuration manage schedule day trash can icon

Figure 10.6.1.4 – Delete Day Schedule Trashcan Icon

The schedule for a day can always be added back by clicking the plus icon next to the day.

Configuration manage schedule day add icon

Figure 10.6.1.5 – Add Day Schedule Icon

Once the schedule has been cleared of off-days, begin defining the rest of the schedule by starting at the first day of the week. Each day will start with a single horizontal bar control next to it, which is based on a 24 hour clock. There are open control point circles on each end of the bar. You can drag these to change the time range.

Configuration manage schedule bar control point

Figure 10.6.1.6 – Control Point on Schedule Bar

Starting at the beginning of the schedule for the work day, drag the control circle on the left (schedule start) to the start of the day. The control circle moves in 5 minute increments, and displays the time above in a tooltip. There are 3 other points along the schedule bar for reference, and those are at 6:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 6:00 pm (18:00). Clicking on any of these points will move the start circle control (the left-most one) to that time. Once the start of the schedule has been set, you can drag the right control (schedule end) to the left to the end time. With the right control you will want to target the beginning of the first break of the day, whether that is a small break or lunch. You can add other segments to the schedule as needed later.

NOTE: This procedure assumes that equipment does not run during operator breaks.

If equipment runs unattended in your situation, breaks may not be relevant. In that case just set one schedule segment for the start and end times for the day. Once a schedule segment has been created for the first part of the day up to the first break, the plus button can be clicked to add the next segment.

Configuration manage schedule add segment button

Figure 10.6.1.7 – Add Schedule Segment Button

After clicking the button, a new schedule segment bar will be added below the original one. The left (start) circle will be set automatically to the end of the last schedule segment, and the right (end) circle will be set to the end of the day.

Configuration manage schedule new segment below original

Figure 10.6.1.8 – New Schedule Segment

Adjust the start circle to the end of the first break, and the end circle to the beginning of the next break. Continue this process until the entire day is filled out, and then repeat for the rest of the days of the week.

Configuration manage schedule example

Figure 10.6.1.9 – Finished Schedule Example

10.6.2 Company Children Schedule (Departments and Equipment)

The process for setting up the schedule for a department or piece of equipment is the same as the one for the company schedule. However, a child will inherit its schedule from its parent further up the company tree. For example, if you have the hierarchy Company -> Department -> Equipment and the department’s schedule has not been modified, the equipment will inherit the company’s global schedule. If the department’s schedule has been modified, the equipment will inherit that. When you click on a child unit in the Company Tree and then click Schedule in the right sidebar, the Schedule section will have a note if the schedule is being inherited.

The inherited schedule can then be edited and customized if a facility, department or specific equipment runs on a different schedule.

Configuration inherited schedule note

Figure 10.6.2.1 – Inherited Schedule Note

10.7 Managing Team Members

Members can be viewed and, if you are an superuser, added by clicking on Settings -> Members button in left sidebar.

Configuration manage members button

Figure 10.7.1 – Manage Members Button

This will open the Manage Team Members table in the center pane of the configuration view.

If you are a Superuser, you will see two additional controls. There will be a Add a Team Member button under Members in the left side bar, and an New Team Member button above the Manage Team Members table.

Configuration add member button

Figure 10.7.2 – Add a Team Member Button

Clicking the Add a Team Member item in the left sidebar will open the Add a new team member form, where a user’s information can be entered.

Configuration new member form

Figure 10.7.4 – Add a new team member Form

Once the user’s information has been added, the Submit button can be clicked to save the user. A user should be able to log in immediately after their information has been submitted.

10.8 Managing Personal Settings

Personal Settings can be accessed via the user menu at the top right of the web interface.

Configuration user settings button

Figure 10.8.1 – Settings Button to Access Personal Settings

Clicking the Settings item opens the Edit Personal Settings view. The fields in the view are explained below.

Configuration personal settings

Figure 10.8.2 – Personal Settings Form

  1. Weekly report enabled: LCM2M sends out a weekly summary report for your organization, allowing you to see how things went during the week. If you do not wish to receive these emails, you can un-check this box.
  2. Weekly report subject: This dropdown is only visible when Weekly report enabled is checked. It allows you to select whether you want to get a weekly report for the company, or one of its child units. For example, supervisors of departments may only want to get the summary email for their department, and not the other departments within the company.
  3. Textable phone #: In order to receive text notifications for alarms, this field must be filled in, and the phone number provided must be able to receive texts.
  4. Only alert during these hours: If All hours is checked, any alerts that you are subscribed to will be sent, regardless of what time of day it is. If hours have been entered (i.e. your normal work hours) in Enabled at and Disabled at, alerts will only be sent during those hours.
  5. Submit: Click this button after all changes have been made to make them permanent.

10.9 Device Config

Clicking on the wrench icon of a device entry in the right sidebar, or connecting to the device directly using a web browser, will display the Device Config page. The Device Config has 3 tabs, and the NETWORK STATUS tab is selected by default when the page is first loaded. Each of the tabs is covered in the following sections, starting with NETWORK STATUS.

10.9.1 NETWORK STATUS Tab

The NETWORK STATUS tab shows the current state of the Caddis device’s connection to its host network, and also to the Caddis Systems Cloud servers. The following diagram highlights each item of interest on the tab, followed by a description of each below.

Figure 10.9.1.1 – The NETWORK STATUS Tab

  1. UUID of the selected device, including a button to COPY the UUID to the system clipboard.
  2. Mode – The mode determines how the device behaves, separating initial setup, standard running, and troubleshooting modes. Each mode is outlined below.
    1. Setup – When a device is initially received from Caddis Systems, it will be in Setup mode. This mode causes a Caddis device to broadcast its own wifi network, which can be connected to in order to bring the device online.
    2. Run – When a device is in Run mode, it will attempt to connect to the Caddis Systems servers to begin sending data. Once initial Setup is complete, the device should switch to this mode automatically. If the device is unsuccessful in its attempts to connect to the servers, it will fall back to Setup mode. The device’s own wifi network is shut down when in this mode to keep from polluting the local area with extra wifi access points.
    3. Watch – When in this mode, the device will attempt to connect to the Caddis Systems servers to begin sending data, but will also broadcast its own wifi network. This mode can be very helpful when trying to troubleshoot a device using the indicators outlined below.
  3. The active tab will be highlighted in blue. In this case NETWORK STATUS is highlighted.
  4. Wifi Status – When the device is able to connect to your local wireless network, it will show CONNECTED here. Otherwise it will show DISCONNECTED. The first step when troubleshooting a device’s connection to the Caddis Systems servers is to make sure that this indicator shows that the device is connected to a wifi network.
  5. Wifi IP Address – The IP address that has been assigned to the device by the wireless network via DHCP, or the IP address that the user set statically. This IP address must be configured correctly for the device to connect to its data collection servers.
  6. Wifi Signal Strength – A percentage that shows how strong the device’s wireless connection to the network is. If this percentage is too low, the Caddis device may have difficulty maintaining a connection to its servers. Below are some rules of thumb on signal strength percentages.
    1. Below 50% – The signal strength needs to be improved. Make sure that the device’s antenna is outside of any equipment cabinets, and ensure that the device has a proper antenna connected. Proximity to a wireless access point can greatly influence the signal strength as well.
    2. Between 50% and 70% – Ideally this would be improved for increased stability, but the device should be able to maintain a connection to its servers within this range.
    3. Over 70% – Signal strength is good, and the device should not have problems staying connected to its servers.
  7. Cloud LCM2M IoT Connection Status – Even once a device has a good connection to its wireless network, it still has to be able to connect the Caddis Systems IoT servers in the Cloud to be able to send data. This indicator will say CONNECTED if the device can reach the Cloud servers, and DISCONNECTED if it cannot. The most likely cause of the device not being able to reach the Cloud servers is that a firewall is blocking its Internet traffic. If the device says DISCONNECTED, please contact your IT service provider for help.
  8. Cloud SNTP Status – Each Caddis device must have accurate time stamps to attach to its data. The device’s clock is kept synchronized via SNTP servers in the Cloud. Without this connection, the device will not send data since the time stamps could be incorrect. This indicator will say CONNECTED if the device can reach the Cloud servers, and DISCONNECTED if it cannot. The most likely cause of the device not being able to reach the Cloud servers is that a firewall is blocking its traffic. If the device says DISCONNECTED, please contact your IT service provider for help.
  9. Firmware Version – This shows what version of the Caddis Systems software the device is running. This information may be requested by the Caddis Systems support team in order to better diagnose problems.
10.9.2 NETWORK SETUP Tab

The NETWORK SETUP tab allows network settings to be changed, and is used mainly during intitial device setup. The following diagram highlights each item of interest on the tab, with a description of each to follow below.

  1. The active tab will be highlighted in blue, which in this case is NETWORK SETUP.
  2. DHCP – Clicking this button will set the Caddis device to automatically request its IP address from the host wifi network. The host network must have a properly configured DHCP server in order for this option to work.
  3. STATIC – Clicking this button will reveal additional controls for IP Address, Netmask, Gateway, and DNS Server. Please contact your IT service provider for instructions on what to enter into these fields for your network if you require a static IP adress.
  4. SCAN – Clicking this button will cause the Caddis device to search for available wireless networks in the vicinity. If the Wifi Networks drop down contains no network entries when the tab loads, you may need to click this button.
  5. Wifi Networks – This is a drop down list of all the wifi networks that the Caddis device can see, along with the signal strength for each network. If signal strength of the desired network is at or below 50%, please verify proper placement of the Caddis device’s antenna, and ensure it is close enough to a wireless access point. Even if this drop down is blank when first setting up a device, you can still click it to get the listing of available networks. Click on the network the Caddis device should be joined to in order to select it.
  6. Password – The password for the wireless network the Caddis device is to join.
  7. SAVE AND RUN – Click this button when all settings have been entered. The device will save the settings and then enter Run mode where it tries to connect to the wireless network and contact the Caddis Systems servers.
10.9.3 INPUT STATUS Tab

The INPUT STATUS tab displays the values of all the inputs to the Caddis device, and what they are currently reading. The diagram below outlines the items of interest, followed by a description of each.

  1. The active tab is highlighted in blue, which in this case is INPUT STATUS.
  2. POLLING – Clicking this button causes the device’s input information to be updated automatically at a set rate, which is every 5 seconds. When connected directly to a Caddis device this will be the default mode, otherwise MANUAL (#3) will be the default to save network traffic.
  3. MANUAL – Button which will be selected by default when the tab loads through app.lcm2m.com, and requires the user to click the REFRESH button to update the input states from the device.
  4. REFRESH – Button which pulls the latest input state information from the Caddis Device. If MANUAL (#3) is selected when the tab first loads, the current time and input states from the device will be displayed, but will not be continually updated. Clicking the REFRESH button will update the clock and input values, as long as the device has maintained a stable network connection since the last refresh. Clicking the POLLING (#2) button automatically refreshes this data, and does not require a user to click the REFRESH button.
  5. 24v – 1 – Indicator that will show LOW when there is no input signal coming into the Caddis device, and HIGH if there is. This can be very helpful when first wiring up a machine to make sure the machine output is changing, and that it is changing at the appropriate time.
  6. 24v – 2 – Indicator that will show LOW when there is no input signal coming into the Caddis device, and HIGH if there is. This can be very helpful when first wiring up a machine to make sure the machine output is changing, and that it is changing at the appropriate time.
  7. 120v – 1 – Indicator that will show LOW when there is no input signal coming into the Caddis device, and HIGH if there is. This can be very helpful when first wiring up a machine to make sure the machine output is changing, and that it is changing at the appropriate time.
  8. 120V – 2 – Indicator that will show LOW when there is no input signal coming into the Caddis device, and HIGH if there is. This can be very helpful when first wiring up a machine to make sure the machine output is changing, and that it is changing at the appropriate time.
  9. Temperature (°f) – Indicates the current temperature being read by the Caddis device, if there is a thermocouple connected. If no thermocouple is connected the value will float high, well above the 1300 °f maximum value that the device can read.
  10. Analog (0 – 10v) –  Indicates the current voltage that the analog input port of the Caddis device is reading. The input port is only capable of reading voltage, not current. The value will read 0 if nothing is hooked up to the analog input port.

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